Welcome to the Peak Performance Blog

Leadership coaching, performance improvement

How to Deal With Change

By Lana Medina  |  Originally published on KUTV SALT LAKE CITY (KUTV) Summer vacation is almost here - end of school, graduation. This is also the time of year when everything changes - home sales increase, vacations, temperature, even how you dress! But not all change is good news. Whether the change is welcome or not, it can be difficult to transition. Life coach Trigena Halley joined Fresh Living today to help us learn how to deal with change. “Much like life, nature doesn’t give us a choice in change, it happens whether we are ready or not! Watching the mountains change with the seasons made me think how the mountains don’t necessarily change but the seasons themselves change the look of mountains. Much like us, who we are generally stays the same, how we approach the “seasons of life” are what changes and grows,” Halley explained. Halley advises following the words of William Bridges, author and expert on change leadership, who makes a distinction between change and transition. According to Bridges, “change is external and tied to a certain situation, transition is the internal, emotional process of how you respond and come to terms with that change.” The understanding between change and transition is key to working with change and helping others navigate change successfully. William Bridges following perspective: • The Ending (Change Occurs) • Neutral Zone (Evaluation Time) • New Beginning (New Normal) “Whether good, bad or indifferent, driven by us or happened upon us, change requires a new pattern of doing, thinking and behaving,” Halley says. Here are some things to think about if you find...

Understanding The Teenage Brain

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV News Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley from Peak Performance CCT, LLC visited Fresh Living to discuss the Teenage Brain. I sit and write this article surrounded by my own four teenagers (ranging in age from 13-17) and a group of their friends chattering and having fun. Unlike many, I think the teen years are my favorite so far, I see most teens as super sharp thinkers, with unlimited potential and opinions. In some ways, for me as a mom, the teen years seem way more manageable than the younger years. So I guess it is not shocking in my study of neuroscience and its impact on leadership and behavior I gravitated to the study of neuroscience and the teenage brain. My stage in life with my family and the fact the teen years intrigue me has led me to some interesting findings. Most of us think alien beings have taken over our kids when they reach the teen years! According to Dr. Jensen, professor of neurology and the chair of the neurology department at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania our teenagers have NOT been taken over by aliens. Although, if you are a parent of one or more teenagers, your vantage point at times may look very different! When it comes to our teenagers, what we often think of, as “alien”, is actually lack of normal brain development. In Dr. Jensen’s book, The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Gide to Raising Adolescents, she describes the central paradox about teen brains - the teen brain offers major...

Emotional Hijacks for a Positive 2017

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV. Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living with Emotional Hijacks to help you enjoy a positive 2017. How to Keep Your Cool! Daniel Goleman, a pioneer in the field of Emotional Intelligence coined the term Emotional Hijack. Emotional hijacking occurs when our thoughts and perceptions (cognitions) are overpowered by our emotions. Emotional hijacking is usually referred to in the context of aggression or fearfulness, and can cause us to lose our cool, explode with emotions and attack another person verbally. Our brain processes information through labeling and ordering. The brain labels information coming in - pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral. Then the brain orders a behavioral response - approach, avoid, or ignore. These are continual processes to the stimuli in our world: Am I safe or not? What should I do? If you are stressed, feel tension about something or have “under the surface” anger the chance of an emotional hijack during situations of stress or distress is high. Past or unresolved negativity can also build up and trigger a sudden emotional outburst. Emotional hijacking follows a specific process in the brain. Our thoughts and perceptions in emotionally charged situations first go through a part of the brain called the amygdala. The amygdala is the seat of all emotions in the brain, when activated the amygdala takes over the prefrontal cortex and basically stops its functioning. Activation of the amygdala triggers the autonomic and behavior responses of fight, flight or freeze. The prefrontal cortex controls our executive functions – problem solving, decision-making, processing complex emotions, reasoning, personality expression,...

Effort and a Growth Mindset

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV. Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living with a great discussion on how Mindset Matters. Mindset Matters! It’s all about Effort and a Growth Mindset Your mindset - what you think and believe about yourself impacts how you perform. And, effort, matters just as much, if not more, than talent. That second sentence will likely spark a conversation from those in my circle who are teachers, parents, leaders and athletic coaches! But, hear me out, there is some very solid (and cool) researcher on this topic. According to Carol Dweck, one of the world’s leading researchers in the field of motivation and a Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, she has found mindset to be very important to success. Her research focuses on why people succeed and how to foster success. Her work has been featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Time, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe, and she has appeared on Today and 20/20. Your minds are constantly monitoring and interpreting what is happening in your world, you form beliefs and assumptions based on your interpretations. There are times, however, when the interpretation process goes awry and you form limiting beliefs and false assumptions and then act in accordance with those (limiting) beliefs and (false) assumptions. When this occurs, it usually causes you to react inaccurately with feelings of anxiety, depression, anger and/or superiority. Your mindset frames up what is taking place in your head, it guides the whole interpretation process. According to Dweck, a Fixed Mindset creates...

Why Personality Matters

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV. Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living to discuss Why Personality Matters and share results of Debbie and Casey’s personal assessments. What makes a good team - collaboration, leadership, compromise, effective communication, trust? All of those skills and traits are important, but equally important is our personality. To be effective in working with others we need to understand both what we need to perform well and also what others need from us to perform at their best. So many times when working with others - be it a spouse, co-worker, child or friend - we misinterpret the needs of others or we take others actions as a personal threat when in reality they are simply trying to get the information or perspective needed from their viewpoint to take action or make a good decision. A great way to learn about your unique personality strengths and preferences this is through a self report assessment call the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The MBTI is a self-report questionnaire designed to help individuals identify their strengths and preferences. The MBTI is a positive way to understand differences between people in both work and personal situations. This assessment is based on Carl Jung’s theory of psychological types, which explains behavior differences in people. Although each individual is unique, these differences fall into patterns for how we prefer to relate to others, where we go to get energy, how we perceive information and how we come to conclusions or make judgments. An abundance of research supports the use of the MBTI. No other...

Taking In Information: Sensing and Intuition

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV. Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living to discuss how we all take in information. Are you a sensor or an intuitive? Taking in Information – Sensing and Intuition! When we think about taking in information, we tend to think in terms of gathering information, disseminating information and the process of sifting through information. An important factor for the flow of information is how we take in and what we consider as it relates to information. For instance, do you see information more literally and through your five senses – see, touch, smell, taste, hear - or do you look for patterns and connections and use more of a “gut feel” and theoretical approach as you consider information. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world - there are two ways in which we take in information – as a Sensor or an Intuitive. According to the MBTI, individuals who take in information and look for what is real and tangible, are observant about specifics and are interested in practical realities of the situation are Sensors. Intuitives, on the other hand, take in information and look for the big picture, consider the relationships and connections between the facts and are especially interested in seeing possibilities. Sensors and Intuitives can gather and synthesize information similarly – the difference is what they perceive in the information. For Sensors, key words are facts, specifics and details. When working with information, they value experience, the practical application of the information...

Making Decisions – Feeling vs. Thinking!

When we think about making decisions, we tend to think in terms of the situation or problem we need to address, information we need to process the decisions and how we implement that decision. Very rarely do we consider the process we naturally utilize to make that decision – such as are we more inclined to be subjective or objective in our process, are we task or people focused and is our approach “tough minded” or “tender hearted”. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world - there are two ways in which we make decisions – as a Thinker or a Feeler. When most of us hear Thinker or Feeler we might generally think of the common following definitions: Thinkers – think a lot, in our “head” Feelers – lots of feelings, proceed with a “heart” approach According to the MBTI, when it comes to our personality we have a slightly different definition of Thinkers and Feelers. Individuals who make decisions looking at the logical consequences of a choice or action and objectively examine the pros and cons of a situation are likely to be Thinkers. Feelers, on the other hand, are defined by considering what is important to them and others involved and mentally place themselves in the situations and make decisions based on their values and honoring others. Thinkers and Feelers both want the same general outcome – the difference is what they focus on as they make their decision. For Thinkers, key words are logic, objectivity and fairness. When working to solve a problem...

How is your Resiliency Factor?

10 protective factors and a model for Resiliency How good are you at protecting and promoting YOUR resiliency? Resilience is defined as the ability to bounce back and subsequently flourish following adversity (Lutherar & Cicchetti, 2000). The Liberty Mutual Olympic commercial touts “Every setback sets the stage for a comeback”, which is true if you are resilient. Without resilience, both leaders and followers stand a greater chance of not reaching goals and desired outcomes. Resilient leaders produce superior results, are more productive and are better positioned physically, emotionally and mentally for the long term. Today’s leaders are challenged with an ever-changing environment filled with uncontrollable, external demands. Resilient leaders are adept at navigating emotionally and relationally demanding situations while also meeting or exceeding performance standards. Resilient leaders relentlessly search for the learning opportunity associated with the hardship and/or crisis. Drs. Nicole Detling, Stephen Gonzalez, and Nick Galli, sport psychology consultants, developed a framework for resiliency in sports, which has been adapted for application to leadership: This framework characterizes the development and demonstration of resilience. Resilience begins with protective factors, which underpin resilient qualities and behaviors. The experience of adversity itself along with positive adaptation and behavior regulation promotes resilience. Finally, [INS: f :INS] eedback gained though the positive adaptation phase supports learning and solidifies resilient behaviors into professional habits. The first step in the process is to develop your protective factors. The 10 protective factors of resilient leadership according to Trigena H. Halley, PCC, BCC and Dr. Nicole Detling are the following: * Difficult Opportunities – growth opportunities through difficult situations, usually voluntary. * Self Care – strategies to support...

Effectively Communicating with Others: How do you do it?

Originally published by Melanie Kennedy on KUTV. Are you a judger or a perceiver? These are two personality types that communicate differently. Life coach Trigena Halley joined Fresh Living to explain how these different personality types can affect how we communicate with others. When most of us think about working together effectively we think about how we communicate, how we show empathy, how we collaborate and how we handle conflict. Very rarely do we consider the impact that “structure” has on our relationships and our ability to work together effectively. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world - there are two ways in which we structure our world - as a Judger or a Perceiver. When most of us hear Judger and Perceiver we generally think of the common following definitions: Judger - judgmental of others Perceiver - how we perceive the world around us According to the MBTI, when it comes to our personality we have different definitions of Judger and Perceiver. Individuals who structure their world in an orderly fashion, make a plan and work the plan, like to make decisions, come to closure, and move on are likely to be Judgers. Perceiver’s, on the other hand, are defined by their ability to adapt quickly, turn on a dime, leave their options open and seek out more data in situations. Judgers and Perceivers both have of structure - the difference is how they operationalize that structure. For Perceivers, the key word is flexibility - an 8:00am appointment means showing up between 8:00-8:15am - time is...

Effective Communication

Are you a judger or a perceiver? These are two personality types that communicate differently. Coach Trigena Halley joined Fresh Living to explain how these different personality types can affect how we communicate with others. When most of us think about working together effectively we think about how we communicate, how we show empathy, how we collaborate and how we handle conflict. Very rarely do we consider the impact that “structure” has on our relationships and our ability to work together effectively. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world - there are two ways in which we structure our world - as a Judger or a Perceiver. When most of us hear Judger and Perceiver we generally think of the common following definitions: Judger - judgmental of others Perceiver - how we perceive the world around us According to the MBTI, when it comes to our personality we have different definitions of Judger and Perceiver. Individuals who structure their world in an orderly fashion, make a plan and work the plan, like to make decisions, come to closure, and move on are likely to be Judgers. Perceiver’s, on the other hand, are defined by their ability to adapt quickly, turn on a dime, leave their options open and seek out more data in situations. Judgers and Perceivers both have of structure - the difference is how they operationalize that structure. For Perceivers, the key word is flexibility - an 8:00am appointment means showing up between 8:00-8:15am - time is flexible and more information and data is always...

Learn Three Steps to Leading Change Successfully

As I sit on my porch I marvel at the Wasatch Mountains, they are beautiful in all seasons here in Utah, but they are exquisite in the Fall when the colors begin to emerge and the mountainside is on “fire” with gold and yellow color! One of the great things about Utah is the four seasons; my favorite is Fall because it is the season that signals the most change….change in schedule (for me, kids are back in school), temperature, color, etc. As I enjoy the scenery it drew my thoughts to how we think about, approach and go forward when change occurs in our lives. Much like life, nature doesn’t give us a choice in change, it happens whether we are ready or not! Watching the mountains change with the seasons made me think how the mountains don’t necessarily change but the seasons themselves change the look of mountains. Much like us, who we are generally stays the same, how we approach the “seasons of life” are what changes and grows. William Bridges, author and expert on change leadership makes a distinction between change and transition. According to Bridges, “change is external and tied to a certain situation, transition is the internal, emotional process of how you respond and come to terms with that change.” The understanding between change and transition is key to living and leading change. Similar to Bridges I see change from the following perspective: · Change · Evaluation · New Normal Whether good, bad or indifferent, driven by us or happened upon us, change requires a new pattern of doing, thinking and behaving. Change...

Fast and Ready or Slow and Steady?

15 years ago I became a self-proclaimed outdoor girl when I moved from the plains of Oklahoma to the mountains and canyons of Utah! My first passion was skiing, then hiking and some river rafting, add in a bit of trail running with some mountain biking and I thought I had pretty much dialed in a good outdoor lifestyle. Then came a weekend in southern Utah where I reached my capacity for hiking and route finding on the trails in southern Utah. After a long, tiring, thirsty and sand in your shoes day I stumbled into Escalante Outfitters to regroup. It was there I met the owners Dennis and Dana Waggoner, and as things go in small towns, I was referred to Rick Green and Amie Fortin at Excursions of Escalante. At Excursions of Escalante I learned about Canyoneering - where you rappel and down climb your way into and out of slot canyons. I hired Rick Green to go out canyoneering and plain old hiking was ruined forever! I have been canyoneering for a few years now, it is a glorious way to see what southern Utah has to offer. The point of this blog is not to profess the merits of canyoneering (although I could fill a blog on that topic) or convince you to visit the wonderful area in southern Utah called Escalante (but it should be on your list of places to visit). Instead, I hope to share what I learned about leadership while hosting a women’s canyoneering weekend retreat. When you go canyoneering with Rick there are a few important items that soon become...

Introverts and Extroverts – What You Need to Know

Salt Lake City — (KUTV) Life Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living to talk about Introverts and Extroverts and what you need to know in order to make the most of your communication. Introverts and Extroverts - What You Need to Know When most of us think about communicating effectively we think about how we show up with others, not necessarily about what energizes others and us in terms of communication. According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator - one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world - there are two ways in which we are “energized”. This energy focus has a large impact on how we communicate, like to be communicated with, and, importantly, how we are energized. When most of us hear introvert and extrovert we generally think of the common following definitions: Extroverts - loud, gregarious, talks more than listens Introverts - quiet, shy, listens more than speaks While some of those traits might be accurate, when we think of personality and what energizes someone they are not completely accurate. Individuals who are energized by people and external events are likely to be an extrovert while an introvert is energized by their internal world of ideas and thoughts. When we talk in terms of energy, it has to do with how drained or invigorated we are in regards to our interactions. Extroverts and introverts can both speak in front of groups or spend time working alone on a project and do it equally well - the difference is in their energy levels during and after the engagement. For introverts, a speaking engagement, volunteer group...

The Optimistic Opportunity: How Our Thoughts Shape Our Behavior

Coach Trigena Halley visited Fresh Living to discuss The Optimistic Opportunity: How Our Thoughts Shape Our Behavior. I love Henry Ford’s quote “Whether you think you can or you think you can’teither way, you are right”, it sums up so well the power our thinking has to our well-being. How we think has powerful ramifications to how we show up in relationships, as parents, as spouses and as leaders, and, how healthy we are physically and emotionally. At a more micro level it has to do with our perspective on Optimism. What is Optimism and Why is it Important? According to the Multi-Health Systems (MHS) Emotional Intelligence model Optimism is an emotional intelligence skill. We don’t usually think of optimism as a skill much less a survival skill. Consider individuals who are survivors - cancer, war, wilderness, etc. - and you will find a common thread of optimism. Think about every day decisions, goals and events in your life, you generally have two ways to respond, you can: Resist the situation Support the situation The first option is pessimism, where you see the situation as incompatible. The fear is usually if the situation changes, the effect will be unpredictable and most likely “bad”. The second option is optimism; you see the situation as an opportunity that will have a positive effect on your situation. With optimism you are willing to explore the situation, even if you don’t understand it. According to the article Why Optimism is the Ultimate Survival Skill there is a scale of beliefs as it relates to optimism. Cynicism - “Everything is bad, doomed, and untrustworthy.”...

Contribute to Others Through Motivational and Developmental Feedback

Giving feedback is one of the most common things we do as parents, spouses and co-workers. When feedback is done well it leads to increased satisfaction, performance and motivation, when not done well it can cause conflict, stress and confusion. As parents one of the best things we can do for our children is to provide both motivational and developmental feedback that contributes to their success. There are typically two forms of feedback - motivational and developmental. Motivational feedback identifies what was done well and why it was important - the individual receiving the feedback understands the positive impact and how to replicate the behavior or action in the future. Developmental feedback identifies what needs to be improved or changed and why that change is necessary. Giving feedback can either be a distributing or contributing process. Distributing feedback is a one-way communication process whereby on person provides their viewpoint while contributing feedback is where a discussion occurs and both parties provide input. Two questions to consider as we give feedback: Am I doing it effectively so behavior can be replicated or changed? Is my feedback distributing (telling) or contributing (designed to impact behavior)? A good feedback model is the STAR approach: S/T (Situation or Task) - Situation or Task - the behavior, action or task. A (Action) - the action taken or not taken R (Result) - the result of the action taken or not taken Emotional vocabulary also gets us in trouble when we give feedback - these are words such as always, never, everybody and nobody. These allness words tend to over exaggerate and cause the other...

How to Navigate Change and Transition in Life

Life Coach Trigena Halley from Peak Performance visited Fresh Living with great tips on how to navigate the changes and transitions in life. One of the great things about Utah is the four seasons; my favorite is Fall because it is the season that signals the most change.change in schedule (for me, kids are back in school), temperature, color, winter is coming (which brings ski season) etc. As I think about the seasonal change it draws my thoughts to how we think about, approach and go forward when change occurs in our lives. Much like life, nature doesn’t give us a choice in change, it happens whether we are ready or not! Watching the mountains change with the seasons made me think how the mountains don’t necessarily change but the seasons themselves change the look of mountains. Much like us, who we are generally stays the same, how we approach the “seasons of life” are what changes and grows. William Bridges, author and expert on change leadership makes a distinction between change and transition. According to Bridges, “change is external and tied to a certain situation, transition is the internal, emotional process of how you respond and come to terms with that change.” The understanding between change and transition is key to working with change and helping others navigate change successfully. William Bridges following perspective: The Ending (Change Occurs) Neutral Zone (Evaluation Time) New Beginning (New Normal) Whether good, bad or indifferent, driven by us or happened upon us, change requires a new pattern of doing, thinking and behaving. The Ending (Change Occurs) - most of us know when...

Reach Your Life Goals

We set goals with excellent intentions, however most of us tend to fall short of those life goals and not necessarily because they are unrealistic, but because we fail to make room in our life to achieve the goals and we fail to address where we might have in-congruence either internally or externally with our goals. Five key approaches that support successful goals: Establish Goals - Determine what you want to achieve - make sure it is clear, achievable and desirable. Define Success - Define what success looks and feels like, must know what it is to achieve it. Release Assumptions, Beliefs, Habits and Behaviors - determine what you need to release in order to make room for new behaviors, habits, etc. Design and Execute - design your plan and begin executing the plan. Check Ecology - check where you internally or externally are incongruent with our goals and execution plan. Most of us stop at tactic 4 in the process of setting goals. Then 6 weeks later we wonder why we are not moving forward in accomplishing our goals. Ecology takes into account the consequences of a planned action or change. Ecology considers the outcomes of the goal and whether it is positive for the individual, supports the overall goal of the group as well as the relationships important to us. To be successful, conducting an ecology check before you move forward will greatly enhance goal achievement. If there is in-congruence or negative type of outcomes that will happen if you execute on your goals which are not addressed and considered you will be far less likely to...

Being Thankful….It’s Not What You Think!

November brings us the tradition of being thankful…a time for giving thanks, doing our 30 days of being thankful on Facebook (okay, Facebook isn’t exactly a tradition) and sharing our blessings around the table on Thanksgiving with family and friends. When I think of being thankful I think of the obvious – family, health, friends and the general blessings of everyday life. But this year, my mind went to something different…what does it look like to be thankful for what we might not always consider or appreciate as a blessing or a gift? Here are a few things I came up with as I considered unconventional thankfulness. Honest Feedback - A love/hate relationship for many of us, and usually most of us don’t see or treat it as what is really is – a gift. Like most gifts, honest feedback has a giver and a receiver, the giver gives of their time and sometimes pays a high price, especially if not taken well by the receiver. For the receiver, at the most basic level, it means someone cares about you. Good or bad, agree or disagree honest feedback offers information to consider. It provides a glimpse of how others view you and allows you the opportunity to compare that viewpoint with your impression of yourself and/or the situation. I have seen honest feedback save careers, improve relationships and be the catalyst for success. Whether honest feedback provides a chance for re-evaluation or simply a different viewpoint, we need to remember it is a gift, for which we should be thankful. Sacrificing to Serving Others - Most of us welcome...